September 2018: All the Books I (Re-)Read this Month & Am I Joining BookTube?

The month of Tishri (or, September) was full of Jewish holidays, from Rosh Hashanah and Sukkot to the Fast of Gedaliah and Yom Kippur, granting me all the rest days to just sit down and devour these books in single sittings. Surprisingly enough, I delved mostly into rereads this month, save for three, given that those are all my physical copies of books. In total, I read and reviewed seven books:

Movies that made my month:

This was pretty much the month of being in Jenny Han’s To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before universe. From watching the Netflix film adaption and reviewing it in detail here, to rereading the trilogy after craving more and more of the same cute, contemporary vibe.

My Patreon:

patreon bookspoils

After much deliberation, and upon watching Ariel Bissett’s vulnerable video on the topic, I decided to create a Patreon with the goal in mind to start creating BookTube videos in the near future. I’ve had the thought circling in my head for the past year, and I’m hyped that the idea is starting to formulate itself into a more concrete shape. I’ve already started noting down any exciting book-related topics to feature that I personally haven’t seen discussed before (aka the Jewish side of BookTube).

Before all that can happen, however, I need help in making this a stable reality. If you would like to participate in this creation, join me on this exciting new road and make a pledge through my Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/bookspoils

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That was my reading wrap-up for September, thank you for reading! Let me know your thoughts down below in the comments. How was your reading month?

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July 2018: Books & Movies

July was full of various reads, including plays, parenting books, poetry collections, and a bunch of great library discoveries. The month felt incredibly satisfying reading-wise, which has been a long time coming this year. In total, nine books were read and reviewed:

Books that made my month:

How to Talk So Teens Will Listen & Listen So Teens Will Talk by Adele Faber & Elaine Mazlish.

How can I express my honest feelings in a way that will make it possible for the other person to hear me and even consider what I have to say?

As I mention in my review for the book, I wholeheartedly stand behind the belief that through our interactions with children we can learn how to behave respectfully to our surroundings; patience, kindness, and acceptance should be shown to all. So I’ve been diving into more books of the kind (and endlessly and unknowingly comparing them to this book), while listening to a bunch of lectures on the subject of gentle parenting, as well. They have been a fruitful source for my learning.

Circling back to the book, the comic illustrations really aide with visually representing the points. I included in my review some of my favorites that I make sure to implement in my personal life. The below idea, in particular, left quite the positive impression:

Instead of Angry Reprimands …How to Talk So Teens Will Listen & Listen So Teens Will Talk 2-- bookspoils

Movies that made my month:

July also being my birth month, I had the privilege to invite my younger sister along to her first-ever cinema experience by watching the Incredibles 2. She’s a huge fan of the first movie and with this much-anticipated release out in the world, it only seemed right to take her along. In the end, I felt so grateful that I got to partake in this memorable experience for her and can only hope and pray for many more to come and share together.

In terms of the movie, we had a grand time watching the relatable family dynamic, especially with the siblings. There were many laugh-out-loud moments, which, funnily enough, became the ones to stay in my head the most from the whole film.

A few of my highlights:

A play-by-play replica of something I’d tell my sister.

As well as Bob “Mr. Incredible” & Dash tackling “new math” together:

I so cherished family scenes showing the realness behind parenting with the trials and errors that Bob took on; it was weirdly comforting to watch.

Finally, I have to veer off a bit to give a quick shout-out to The Office for creating this epic birthday scene:

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That was my July wrap-up, thank you for reading!

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June 2018: Wrap Up

Hey June, thanks for a month full of exciting reads and rereads. Featuring: unexpected rereads, a new gem of a TV show, and exciting seven books:

ON THE SPECTRUM:

This new Israeli contemporary show follows three young people on the autism spectrum who share a flat together. And watching it felt like discovering a true gem.

I consider On the Spectrum to be a true surprise, considering how its slow start made me, foolishly, put it aside for a hot minute, but upon noticing my mind circling back to it, I, thankfully, went back to complete the remainder with stars in my eyes.OTS-- bookspoils 2OTS-- bookspoils 1(That Husky in the left corner, though!!)

I know a show is good when, upon completing it, I make my mom look into the first episode so that I can vent all about it. I practically talked her ear off on the first episode alone… On the Spectrum is the kind of show I crave to devour all at once, so having to wait for new episodes to release every week is excruciating, so much so that I’m low-key piqued whenever an episode comes to an end; it always arrives all-too-soon.

The slow revealing nature of the show, with keeping the cards off the table to keep us engaged, was delicious. The creators trust us enough to slowly piece together the bigger picture through tiny revelations on our own. Plus, major props to the writers for not dropping plot lines the following episode. Something that occurred in previous episodes will probably receive closure within the next one. Like, the dog from the street. (Won’t go into details, though, because this show deserves to be watched and discovered through fresh eyes.)

Ben Yosipovich, The actor that plays Amit’s character, says it best when, to paraphrase, he talks about how the show succeeds in showing big emotional moments not because they’re these Big Emotional Moments, but because they’re these subtly embodied gestures, just like in real life.

The trailer with English subtitles:

The tree mains are:

  • Zohar who has her overprotective brother, Asher, with a heart of gold, taking care of her.23I can clearly hear Zohar’s voice reverberating through this powerful scene. I get chills on her aching “But I want to be touched already!”
  • Ron who lives in his routine bubble of avoiding life so he doesn’t feel fear, which is why he likes it and is hesitant to change course.

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  • Amit, who’s the hardest to pin down in writing, but the most intriguing to follow on his outings. Like, his bird watching in the second episode:

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That was my June wrap-up, thank you for reading!